tao art

May 14, 2010

When rain-washed coils of mountain
Appear in the sky
A refreshing wind sweeps away
The fog and clouds.
Where did you acquire the mastery
Of Yongmyon
To paint exquisite beauty
Beyond human art?

– Jaewol Kyunghun (1542-1632)

show me the way

May 9, 2010

Fallen leaves hide the mountain path.
No one around to ask directions.
An old monk sweeps the ground.
A novice rushes up to greet me.

– Jungkwan Ilson (1533-1608)

big mind

May 7, 2010

Deaf, he hears his own nature.
Blind, he sees his Original Mind.
The empty, clear moon
In the water rises
Where heart and mind are forgotten.

– Jungkwan Ilson (1533-1608)

rain or sun
cool or warm
the rhythm of the ocean
and the smell of the pines
make leaving this place a solemn event.

east meets west
material rises to the spiritual
ultimately falling short.

one is recollected in time
and reality is contained in the now.
make your home your resort and
repose is wherever you are.

– dsk

one life, many faces

April 28, 2010

I learned the three virtues from my teacher
And watch the grass in the wind
To know Buddha nature.
When I brood all alone
In the desolate hermitage,
I realize I have lived many
Lives as a monk.

– Hueng Powoo (d.1565)

equanimity

April 23, 2010

Spiritual practitioners thrive in unpredictable conditions, testing and refining the inner qualities of heart and mind. Every situation becomes an opportunity to abandon judgment and opinions and to simply give complete attention to what is. Situations of inconvenience are terrific areas to discover, test, or develop your equanimity.

How gracefully can you compromise in a negotiation? Does your mind remain balanced when you have to drive around the block three times to find a parking space? Are you at ease waiting for a flight that is six hours delayed? These inconveniences are opportunities to develop equanimity. Rather than shift the blame onto an institution, system, or person, one can develop the capacity to opt to rest within the experience of inconvenience.

– Shaila Catherine, from “Equanimity in Every Bite”

orange

April 23, 2010

There is an old Zen saying that you can try to explain to someone how an orange tastes, but how can you describe it, really?  Until you’ve tasted an orange, you have no way of truly knowing.  And once you’ve tasted one, what is there to say?

– unknown