rain or sun
cool or warm
the rhythm of the ocean
and the smell of the pines
make leaving this place a solemn event.

east meets west
material rises to the spiritual
ultimately falling short.

one is recollected in time
and reality is contained in the now.
make your home your resort and
repose is wherever you are.

– dsk

let go

April 29, 2010

How shall I grasp it?  Do not grasp it.  That which remains when there is no more grasping is the Self.

– Panchadasi

good vacation

April 19, 2010

For ten miles the mountains rise
Above the lake. The beauty of
Water and mountains is
Impossible to describe.
In the glow of evening
A traveler sits in front
Of an inn, sipping wine.
The moon shines above a
Little bridge and a single
Fisherman. Around the farm
A bamboo fence descends to
The water. I chat with an
Old man about work and crops.
Maybe, when the years have come
When I can lay aside my
Cap and robe of office,
I can take a little boat
And come back to this place.

– Chu His (1130-1200)

all that is

April 17, 2010

Pine trees murmur in the wind.
Spring water bubbles in stone.
The moon sets at dawn.
An owl hoots in the mountains.

– Jinkag Haesim (1178-1234)

mountain home

April 15, 2010

My zen hut leans at the summit
Clouds sail back and forth
A waterfall hangs in front
A mountain ridge crests in back
On a rock wall I sketched three buddhas
For incense there’s a plum branch in a jar
The fields below might be level
But can’t match a mountain home free of dust.
– Stonehouse

big box love

April 13, 2010

I try to relate the Dharma to 21st-century human beings.  As Einstein said, we human beings utilize only five to ten percent of our brain’s capacity.  In the same way, we use only five to ten percent of our heart’s capacity to love and feel kindness.

Instead of boxing in our hearts, loving only me, me, me—the smallest box—we must try to slowly expand that box till we’re able to love all humanity, all sentient beings.  When we use our maximum intelligence to access these deeper levels, to go beyond the material, then we become wise.

We realize interdependence and the transitory nature of existence—this is how we free ourselves from suffering.  Then we can bring a lasting peace and happiness to the world.

– Nawang Khechog

these four walls

April 6, 2010

My body is like an illusory flower:
No way to touch it;
The window and the moon of its six windows
Contain clear emptiness.
It looks like something
In the midst of nothingness,
But its four walls are beautiful,
I stay there for a moment.

– Naong Haegun (1320-1376)